Laurie Sloane   Licensed Clinical Social Worker


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Over the past 30 years, a combination of diverse professional experiences and extensive training have made me the therapist I am today. In addition to a Master’s Degree in Social Work, I have participated in continuing education courses and seminars to ensure that I am incorporating the latest in psychoanalysis into treatment plans.

I joined the faculty of the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center (PPSC), a post-graduate training institute, and served as the Executive Director for 10 years. During my tenure, I taught and supervised candidates, developed an internship program for graduate students, and worked to establish guidelines for training and licensure in New York.  My expertise is broad and far-reaching.

My current areas of specialty are: 

Therapy for Young Adults

Of late, more attention has been focused on the well-being of anxious, depressed and suicidal students on college campuses. I have worked with many students trying to adjust to life away from home. The social and academic pressures of college can bring about the emergence of major mental illness and addiction that needs to be addressed with the proper treatment. In addition to individual sessions, I also offer group treatment to college students and young adults.

Therapy for Women of all ages

I have extensive experience in counseling women of all ages who suffer from eating disorders. Today, there are a variety of treatments available; I’m able to help navigate through the options and figure out which will work best on a case by case basis.

As baby boomers are aging, they are learning that menopause no longer spells the end. Life after 65 continues to be an important, yet often overlooked part of adult development. I’m able to offer support in either individual or group therapy sessions for women navigating midlife and beyond.

Therapy for Veterans

I am affiliated with Here to Help Military and Families, a Long Island group that offers free counseling to returning veterans and their families. I offer a holistic approach to treatment; for both veterans returning from combat, suffering from the effects of trauma and PTSD, as well as their families, who are struggling to understand how difficult reentry into civilian life can be.
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What can you gain from therapy?

Connection to others

Over the past 30 years, I’ve learned a lot about relationships and the value in sharing our thoughts and feelings with friends and partners. Knowing we are being listened to, valued and understood is crucial to emotional wellbeing.

Hope for the future

Therapy is a process. Though there is often no simple, quick solution, it provides a safe space to explore emotions, thoughts, and actions in an in-depth and meaningful way, to eventually bring about change.

Growth and change

Through continued treatment, therapy can be an incredibly powerful tool in helping to significantly improve your quality of life and outlook.

Call me today at 212-413-7088 for a free 15 minute phone consultation.

Category Archives: Psychotherapist for Grief

The Sadness of Saying Goodbye: When to See a Psychotherapist for Grief

nyc-psychotherapist-for-grief-counseling-01Do you need to see a psychotherapist for grief? Loss is an inevitable and difficult part of life. It can occur in many forms. Most commonly it occurs through the death of a loved one. Other times it can be the loss of a pet, a place, or part of one’s self. The resulting reaction is typically called grief and it can be complicated. Today’s world may say that you should be able to work through that grief and move on in a matter of weeks. However, that is not always possible. Sometimes, you may need help through therapy to cope with a loss. Learn more:

Typical Grief Response

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An incidence of grief usually starts after learning of some loss. You may have heard that people typically go through certain responses during the grief process. Some research says that people go through stages of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

  • Denial encapsulates the initial response of wanting to believe the loss is not true.
  • Once the denial dissipates, people may feel anger at the perceived cause of the loss.
  • Bargaining includes attempts to resolve the situation (such as asking a higher power for help).
  • Depression often occurs when the person loses any hope of resolution.
  • Acceptance happens once the person comes to terms with the situation.

While this sounds like a difficult process, it is also conveyed as simply a series of stages you must get through before the grief will resolve. However, grief is more complex than that and many people do not simply follow these stages. They may cycle back to previous stages or never reach acceptance.

Further, grief can contain many more emotions than anger and depression. Depending on the situation, you might experience several complex emotions simultaneously. For example, perhaps you lost someone, but they were suffering and in pain, so you feel sad but relieved.

There is a lot that can occur in a “normal” or “typical” grief response. Many people find it helpful to seek support in processing through their grief. It can be nice to have a counselor available who will listen and guide you through the process no matter what stage you are in or what specific reaction you have.

Unexpected Grief Reactions

top-nyc-psychotherapist-for-grief-counseling-03Historically, grief was typically given more time and tradition. People were in mourning for an extended period. They wore black so that the world around them knew they were grieving. This was not to mark them in a negative way, instead it honored the gravity of their loss.

In today’s culture, there is not a lot of time or tradition given to grieving. Sure, there will be a funeral if you lose a person. But many workplaces expect people to return to work in a matter of weeks. The loss of a pet may garner too little sympathy. If you lose something more ambiguous such as a home to a fire or a career path you had planned, then you might be grieving without others recognizing.

In any of these cases, people can experience grief that may be more difficult to resolve. Sometimes there may be intense anxiety (such as being afraid of separation from loved ones for fear they may die too) or intense depression that does not resolve (and instead starts to impair daily functioning.

In these situations, counseling can become imperative. Counselors are trained to assist people with complicated bereavement processes. Therapists can also help you to resolve any anxiety and depression that may have grown out of your grief reaction.

Closing Thoughts

Grief can be complex and sometimes people require additional support to work through it. If you find that you need support to process your grief and return to the business of living, consider seeking the support of a counselor.

Contact Licensed Clinical Social Worker Laurie Sloan today at 212-413-7088 to schedule an appointment, she can help guide you through the bereavement process.

For more information, please visit my main website at: www.LaurieSloane.com